Related Resources

Bureau of Justice Assistance Grantee Resources at a Glance
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Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA), n.d. This section of the BJA website provides links to standard forms, the OJP Financial Guide, OMB Circulars, Program Manager Contact List, and BJA Program Guidelines.

Co-Occurrence of Substance Use Behaviors in Youth
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Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP), November 2008. The main finding is that the occurrence of one substance-use behavior made other substance-use behaviors more likely; for example, 9 percent of all youth ages 12-17 reported marijuana use, and 8 percent said they had sold drugs. Among youth who reported drinking alcohol (23 percent of all youth ages 12-17), the level of marijuana use was 32 percent, and the level of drug selling was 23 percent. In contrast, among youth ages 12-17 who did not report recent alcohol use, the level of marijuana use was 2 percent, and the level of drug selling was 3 percent. Of the youth who reported marijuana use, 81 percent also reported they drank alcohol, and 45 percent reported having sold drugs. Of the youth who reported selling drugs, 68 percent indicated they drank alcohol, and 54 percent reported marijuana use. In contrast, among youth who reported having sold drugs, 19 percent drank alcohol, and 6 percent used marijuana. Among those who sold drugs, both White and Hispanic youth were more likely than African-Americans to also report alcohol use; White youth who sold drugs were also more likely than African-Americans who sold drugs to report using marijuana. Generally, the levels of reported substance use steadily increased with age. Across age groups, there was a substantial overlap of drinking alcohol, using marijuana, and selling drugs. The NLSY97 involved self-reports from a nationally representative sample of youth ages 12-17. The survey asked about drinking alcohol and using marijuana in the previous 30 days, and ever selling marijuana, hashish, or other hard drugs. 4 tables and 7 figures. (NCJ 219239)

Gang Resistance and Education Training Program (G.R.E.A.T)
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Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA), n.d. The G.R.E.A.T. Program is a school-based, law enforcement officer-instructed classroom curriculum. The program's primary objective is prevention and is intended as an immunization against delinquency, youth violence, and gang membership.

Highlights of the 2006 National Youth Gang Survey
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Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP), July 2008. Reports findings from the 2006 National Youth Gang Survey. Data on the number of gangs, gang members, and gang-related homicides in larger cities, suburban counties, smaller cities, and rural counties are provided to accurately reflect youth gang activity in the United States. Based on survey results, it is estimated that nearly 3,400 jurisdictions across the United States experienced gang activity in 2006.

Impact of Gangs on Communities
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National Youth Gang Center (NYGC), August 2006. This bulletin considers the impact of gang-related criminal activity on communities. It examines the impact of youth gangs in more populous cities - those with populations over 50,000.

Jail Information Model
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Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS), November 2006. The Jail Information Model is a new process designed to cultivate jail-based information about internal and external safety and security issues, and to disseminate it to the appropriate offices or agencies in order to solve or prevent crimes and improve public safety. This Jail Information Model encourages and promotes a paradigm shift from traditional corrections activities to proactive public safety capabilities. This shift helps to solve current crimes, prevent future crimes or reduce their impact, save lives and property in the jail and the community, and improve community quality of life. This report highlights the success and lessons learned in the three pilot sites used in this project.

National Youth Gang Center
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National Youth Gang Center (NYGC), n.d. The purpose of the NYGC is to assist policymakers, practitioners, and researchers in their efforts to reduce youth gang involvement and crime by contributing information, resources, practical tools, and expertise towards the development and implementation of effective gang prevention, intervention, and suppression strategies.

National Youth Gang Survey, 1999-2001
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National Institute of Justice (NIJ), National Youth Gang Center (NYGC), July 2006. This report provides the results of the 1999, 2000, and 2001 National Youth Gang Survey as well as the preliminary results from the 2002 survey. Overall, the findings reveal the significant variability in the characteristics and behaviors of gangs across the Nation, indicating that communities should comprehensively assess their local gang problem before developing prevention programming. Communities are urged to adopt the Comprehensive Gang Prevention, Intervention, and Suppression Model, which identifies the most promising strategies for reducing gang problems. (NCJ 209392)

Office of Justice Programs (OJP) State Administering Agencies
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Office of Justice Programs (OJP), n.d. Many OJP grants are awarded directly to state governments, which then set priorities and allocate funds within that state. For more information on how a state intends to distribute formula grant funds, contact the state administering agency. In addition, information is available for the information technology point of contact in each state.

Parentsí Guide to Gangs 2006
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Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP), 2006. Behaviors associated with joining a gang, common gang identifiers, and what parents can do are the three issues targeted in this pocket guide for parents. Some of the behaviors associated with joining a gang include: negative changes in behavior, suspected drug use, unexplained cash or goods, and the presence of firearms. Common gang identifiers referenced include: gang-style clothing and dress, symbols and numbers, colors, sports items, graffiti, tattoos, hand signs, and gang-influenced music and movies. Research indicates that parents play a vital role in keeping young people out of gangs. Parents can protect their children from gang activity. However, parents often lack factual information about gangs. This pocket guide is designed to provide parents with essential information in order to recognize and prevent gang involvement. In addressing prevention efforts, parents are encouraged to talk to their children about gangs and how to avoid gangs, to talk to their children about ways to deal with pressure from friends, to set firm limits with their children and teens, and to plan family time.

Problem-Solving Tips: A Guide to Reducing Crime and Disorder through Problem-Solving Partnerships
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Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS), July 2006. This guidebook, part of the Problem-Oriented Guides for Police series, will help communities use the SARA model (scanning, analysis, response and assessment) for building problem-solving partnerships.

Regional Information Sharing Systems (RISSINFO)
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Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA), n.d. The Regional Information Sharing Systems (RISS) Program is an innovative law enforcement program that receives federal funding to support regional law enforcement efforts to combat terrorist activity, illegal drug trafficking, organized criminal activity, criminal gangs, violent crime, and other regional criminal priorities and to promote officer safety. On national-scope issues, the six regional centers initiate joint, cross-center efforts, coordinating and cooperating as one body.

Using Analysis for Problem-Solving: A Guide Book for Law Enforcement
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Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS), August 2006. This guide provides law enforcement practitioners with a resource for conducting problem analysis. It summarizes many challenges of the analysis phase of the problem-solving process. This book builds on the foundation presented in Problem-Solving Tips: A Guide to Reducing Crime and Disorder Through Problem-Solving Partnerships, and complements the Problem-Oriented Guides for Police Series. The guide also identifies tools for analysis and proposes tips for effectively using each tool.