Recruitment CD, Version 1.0

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Category Alphabetical COPS Publications
Title Funding Organization PDF TXT HTML Abstract
1. Recruitment and Hiring
A Guide to Developing, Maintaining, and Succeeding With Your School Resource Officer Program COPS PDF TXT   Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS), June 2005. This guide for school resource officer (SRO) programs focuses on recruitment, screening, retaining, training, supervision, identification of funding sources, and the maintenance of funding. Promising methods used by these programs to address the aforementioned problem area are featured in this guide.
Cop Crunch: Identifying Strategies for Dealing with the Recruiting and Hiring Crisis in Law Enforcement NIJ / PERF PDF     National Institute of Justice (NIJ), Police Executive Research Forum (PERF), December 2005. In response to law enforcement agencies' crisis with recruitment and hiring, this federally supported report examines the nature and extent of the “cop crunch” and identifies department-level policies and/or practices that facilitate the recruiting and hiring of quality personnel, including women and minorities. (NCJ 213800)
Hillsborough County Sheriff's Office Radio Commercial (Spanish) Hillsborough County Sheriff's Office     HTML  
Hillsborough County Sheriff's Office Television Commercial (Spanish) Hillsborough County Sheriff's Office     HTML  
Hiring & Retaining More Women: The Advantages to Law Enforcement Agencies NCWP PDF     National Center for Women in Policing (NCWP), 2003. This publication lists six advantages for law enforcement agencies that hire and retain more women. These advantages include: female officers are proven to be as competent as their male counterparts; female officers are less likely to use excessive force; female officers implement community-oriented policing; more female officers will improve law enforcement’s response to violence against women; increasing the presence of female officers reduces problems of sex discrimination and harassment within a law enforcement agency; and the presence of women can bring about beneficial changes in policy for all officers.
Hiring and Keeping Police Officers NIJ PDF     National Institute of Justice (NIJ), July 2004. This study analyzed the hiring and retention of police officers. As a result of federal funding and increased demands for service, more than half of the Nation’s police agencies grew in officer strength during the late 1990s. The supply of good police recruits was down throughout the nation during the summer of 2000. The researchers used three methods for studying police staffing issues: a national survey of police agencies, a critical synthesis of the literature, and an analysis of police employment data. (NCJ 202289)
Hiring and Retention Issues in Police Agencies: Readings on the Determinants of Police Strength, Hiring and Retention of Officers, and the Federal COPS Program NIJ PDF     National Institute of Justice (NIJ), October 2001. This report presents a series of papers that address the following staffing issues in policing: determinants of police staffing levels, the processes of hiring and training officers, and retention patterns related to individual officers and staff positions. (NCJ 193428)
Innovations in Police Recruitment and Hiring: Hiring in the Spirit of Service COPS PDF TXT   Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS), January 2006. This report presents findings from the COPS Office's Hiring in the Spirit of Service (HSS) project, a federally funded project that engages the community in recruiting and hiring service-oriented law enforcement personnel. Five HSS demonstrations sites, chosen through a competitive process, are analyzed to highlight how sites involved citizens in substantial ways to create new recruiting methods and marketing initiatives with the goal of attracting recruits who would make good community police officers. The major HSS objectives are to develop an agency brand or image, revise occupational and psychological screenings, and institutionalize a range of new hiring practices that reflect the policing paradigm shift.
Las Vegas Police Department/Protect the City LVMPD     HTML Los Vegas Metropolitan Police Department (LVMPD), n.d. Example of a successful police recruitment web site.
Lengthening the Stride: Employing Peace Officers From Newly Arrived Ethnic Groups NCPC PDF TXT   National Crime Prevention Council (NCPC), 1995. This volume examines and addresses the issues surrounding hiring police officers from immigrant ethnic groups. The report uses information from several law enforcement agencies that have recruited and hired from such groups in their areas. (NCJ 159738)
Mobilizing the Community for Minority Recruitment and Selection COPS / IACP PDF     Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS), International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP), December 2003. A strategy to leverage community assets to enhance recruitment and placement of minorities.
National Center for Women in Policing/Feminist Majority Foundation NCWP     HTML National Center for Women in Policing (NCWP), n.d. Web site containing female perspectives on policing, recruiting, and hiring. Also contains news on female policing.
Police Training Officer (PTO) Program Manual COPS PDF TXT   Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS), April 2006. The manual guides agencies implementing the Police Training Officer (PTO) Program and the PTO Officers who train academy graduates. This manual is part of a 4-part series that includes, PTO Overview and Introduction, PTO Manual, PTO Trainee Manual, and PTO Training Standard.
Police Training Officer (PTO) Program Overview and Introduction COPS PDF TXT   Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS), April 2006. This document provides an introduction to the PTO program, and summarizes the valuable experiences and lessons learned from the six agencies selected to participate in the PTO pilot project. This manual is part of a 4-part series that includes, PTO Overview and Introduction, PTO Manual, PTO Trainee Manual, and PTO Training Standard.
Police Training Officer (PTO) Program Trainee Manual COPS PDF TXT   Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS), April 2006. This manual is used by the academy graduate (recruit) undergoing Police Training Officer (PTO) training. This manual is part of a 4-part series that includes, PTO Overview and Introduction, PTO Manual, PTO Trainee Manual, and PTO Training Standard.
Police Training Officer (PTO) Program Training Standards COPS PDF TXT   Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS), April 2006. The Police Training Officer (PTO) Training Standard guide is intended for use in training PTOs. This manual is part of a 4-part series that includes, PTO Overview and Introduction, PTO Manual, PTO Trainee Manual, and PTO Training Standard.
POST Recruitment and Retention: Best Practices Update POST PDF     California Commission on Peace Officers Standards & Training (POST), April 2006. This report presents the results of a 2005 survey approved by the Commission to provide an update on recruitment and retention best practices in California. It addresses the rapidly changing environment of law enforcement in California, provides information and resources to assist law enforcement in addressing recruitment and retention issues, and updates best practices for agencies to consider in improving recruitment and retention. (NCJ 215740)
Questions and Answers: The Americans With Disabilities Act and Hiring Police Officers U.S. Department of Justice, Civil Rights Division     HTML U.S. Department of Justice, Civil Rights Division, March 1997. The Americans with Disabilities Act, or ADA, is a civil rights law guaranteeing equal opportunity to jobs for qualified individuals with disabilities. This paper lists and answers 20 questions most commonly raised by police departments.
Recruiting and Retaining Women: A Self-Assessment Guide for Law Enforcement BJA / NCWP PDF TXT   Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA), National Center for Women in Policing (NCWP), June 2001. Under a grant from the U.S. Department of Justice, BJA and NCWP developed a self-assessment guide to assist agencies seeking to recruit and retain more women in sworn law enforcement positions. This publication will help federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies examine their policies and procedures to identify and remove obstacles to hiring and retaining sworn and civilian women employees at all levels within the organization. It also provides a list of resources for agencies to use when they plan or implement changes to their current policies and procedures.
Recruitment and Retention of Qualified Police Personnel: A Best Practices Guide IACP PDF     International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP), July 2000. A feature article published in "Big Ideas for Smaller Police Departments," a newsletter designed to respond to the needs of smaller police departments. Recruitment and retention of qualified law enforcement personnel is of great concern to communities around the country. Smaller departments are challenged by limited resources to advertise and compete against larger departments, often for the same applicants. The goal in writing this article was to find smaller departments around the country that are successful recruiting and retaining, identify their strengths, and compile those strengths in a best practices guide.
Recruitment and Retention Study Series: Sworn Police Personnel North Carolina Governor's Crime Commission PDF     North Carolina Governor's Crime Commission, April 2003. This report examines the challenges involved in recruiting and retaining North Carolina’s sworn police personnel. The findings are based on 124 responses to a 27-item survey that was administered to a random sample of 205 state and local police agencies. Survey questions probed issues related to recruiting sworn police officers, including specific strategies or techniques, number of applicants, and length of waiting list time for potential candidates. Attrition and retention were also probed through questions related to the agency’s turnover and vacancy rates. (NCJ 205838)
Recruitment and Retention Study Series: Sworn Sheriffs’ Personnel North Carolina Governor's Crime Commission PDF     North Carolina Governor's Crime Commission, April 2003. This report examines the challenges involved in recruiting and retaining North Carolina’s sworn sheriffs’ personnel. The findings are based on 49 responses to a 22-item survey was administered to a random sample of 80 sheriffs’ offices. Survey questions probed issues related to recruiting sworn sheriffs’ personnel, including specific strategies or techniques, number of applicants, and length of waiting list time for potential candidates (NCJ 205839)
The National Law Enforcement Recruiters Association NIJ     HTML National Institute of Justice (NIJ), n.d. The largest law enforcement, corrections, military and private security human resources organization in the United States. It assists law enforcement, corrections, military and private security recruiters, and applicant investigators to attract qualified candidates through the exchange of leading practices, successful initiatives, and networking among members, law enforcement, community leaders, and related association partners.
2. Retention and Training
A Guide to Developing, Maintaining, and Succeeding With Your School Resource Officer Program COPS PDF TXT   Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS), June 2005. This guide for school resource officer (SRO) programs focuses on recruitment, screening, retaining, training, supervision, identification of funding sources, and the maintenance of funding. Promising methods used by these programs to address the aforementioned problem area are featured in this guide.
Assessment of the Law Enforcement Family Support Grant: Vermont State Police, Final Report NIJ PDF     National Institute of Justice (NIJ), December 1998. This report presents the methodology and findings of an evaluation of the Critical Incident Stress Management and Critical Incident Stress Debriefing training program for Vermont State Troopers, dispatchers, and their spouses or significant others. (NCJ 186278)
Best Practices for Institutionalizing Mentoring into Police Departments IACP PDF     International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP), January 2003. During the summer of 2000, the IACP project, Services, Support and Technical Assistance for Smaller Police Departments, published the first of the Best Practice Series–Recruitment and Retention of Qualified Police Personnel. One of the strategies cited as an excellent means of enhancing law enforcement recruitment and retention efforts was the practice of employee mentoring. This document provides chiefs from smaller police departments with a step-by-step method for institutionalizing mentoring within their agency.
Building Tools for a Learning Organization DOJ PDF     U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ), June 2004. This study evaluated the Ada County, Idaho Sheriffs Office (ACSO) delivery of community policing services, as well as its advancement toward becoming a learning organization.
Development of Peer Support Programs in Native American and Campus Police Departments NIJ PDF     National Institute of Justice (NIJ), April 2001. This report provided an overview in the development, implementation, and evaluation of a peer support stress identification and reduction program within Native American and campus police departments in Arizona. (NCJ 189123)
Hiring & Retaining More Women: The Advantages to Law Enforcement Agencies NCWP PDF     National Center for Women in Policing (NCWP), 2003. This publication lists six advantages for law enforcement agencies that hire and retain more women. These advantages include: female officers are proven to be as competent as their male counterparts; female officers are less likely to use excessive force; female officers implement community-oriented policing; more female officers will improve law enforcement’s response to violence against women; increasing the presence of female officers reduces problems of sex discrimination and harassment within a law enforcement agency; and the presence of women can bring about beneficial changes in policy for all officers.
Hiring and Keeping Police Officers NIJ PDF     National Institute of Justice (NIJ), July 2004. This study analyzed the hiring and retention of police officers. As a result of federal funding and increased demands for service, more than half of the Nation’s police agencies grew in officer strength during the late 1990s. The supply of good police recruits was down throughout the nation during the summer of 2000. The researchers used three methods for studying police staffing issues: a national survey of police agencies, a critical synthesis of the literature, and an analysis of police employment data. (NCJ 202289)
Hiring and Retention Issues in Police Agencies: Readings on the Determinants of Police Strength, Hiring and Retention of Officers, and the Federal COPS Program NIJ PDF     National Institute of Justice (NIJ), October 2001. This report presents a series of papers that address the following staffing issues in policing: determinants of police staffing levels, the processes of hiring and training officers, and retention patterns related to individual officers and staff positions. (NCJ 193428)
Lessons Learned From Early Corrections and Law Enforcement Family Support (CLEFS) Programs NIJ PDF     National Institute of Justice (NIJ), 2001. This report discusses the lessons learned from the first 3 years of funding (1996 through 1998) the NIJ-sponsored Corrections and Law Enforcement Family Support (CLEFS) Program, which has addressed the negative effects of stress experienced by law enforcement and correctional officers and their families. (NCJ 192287)
National Institute of Justice Law Enforcement Peer Support Training NIJ PDF     National Institute of Justice (NIJ), February 1999. This training manual provides an informational course to Peer Support Counselors involved in Arizona Fraternal Order of Police Lodge #51’s peer support stress identification and reduction program within Native American and campus police departments. (NCJ 189124)
On-Line Education, Resources and Support for Law Enforcement Families, Final Report NIJ PDF     National Institute of Justice (NIJ), 2001. Because stress reduction is an important focus of many police department programs and federally-funded initiatives, this study hypothesized that an on-line curriculum designed for rookie police officers, veteran spouses, and children would provide additional support and increase the resilience of police officers and their families. (NCJ 186749)
Police Family Life Education Project (FLEP) Implementation, September 11, 1999, October 2, 1999, April 29, 2000 and June 24, 2000 and Follow-Up Surveys of Families Who Attended Each of the Classes -- Final Report NIJ PDF     National Institute of Justice (NIJ), 2001. Final report on implementation of the Police Family Life Education Project and follow-up surveys of families who attended each class.
Police Training Officer (PTO) Program COPS     HTML Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS), 2006. The Police Training Officer (PTO) program represents an alternative national model for field training that incorporates community policing and problem-solving principles. It incorporates contemporary methods of adult education and a version of the Problem-Based Learning (PBL) method of teaching adapted for police. The PTO program represents the first new post-academy field training program for law enforcement agencies in more than 30 years.
Police Training Officer (PTO) Program Manual COPS PDF TXT   Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS), April 2006. The manual guides agencies implementing the Police Training Officer (PTO) Program and the PTO Officers who train academy graduates. This manual is part of a 4-part series that includes, PTO Overview and Introduction, PTO Manual, PTO Trainee Manual, and PTO Training Standard.
Police Training Officer (PTO) Program Overview and Introduction COPS PDF TXT   Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS), April 2006. This document provides an introduction to the PTO program, and summarizes the valuable experiences and lessons learned from the six agencies selected to participate in the PTO pilot project. This manual is part of a 4-part series that includes, PTO Overview and Introduction, PTO Manual, PTO Trainee Manual, and PTO Training Standard.
Police Training Officer (PTO) Program Trainee Manual COPS PDF TXT   Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS), April 2006. This manual is used by the academy graduate (recruit) undergoing Police Training Officer (PTO) training. This manual is part of a 4-part series that includes, PTO Overview and Introduction, PTO Manual, PTO Trainee Manual, and PTO Training Standard.
Police Training Officer (PTO) Program Training Standards COPS PDF TXT   Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS), April 2006. The Police Training Officer (PTO) Training Standard guide is intended for use in training PTOs. This manual is part of a 4-part series that includes, PTO Overview and Introduction, PTO Manual, PTO Trainee Manual, and PTO Training Standard.
POST Recruitment and Retention: Best Practices Update POST PDF     California Commission on Peace Officers Standards & Training (POST), April 2006. This report presents the results of a 2005 survey approved by the Commission to provide an update on recruitment and retention best practices in California. It addresses the rapidly changing environment of law enforcement in California, provides information and resources to assist law enforcement in addressing recruitment and retention issues, and updates best practices for agencies to consider in improving recruitment and retention. (NCJ 215740)
Profiling Police: Evaluating the Predictive and Structural Validity of an Actuarial Method for Screening Civil Liabilities Among Police Officer Candidates NIJ PDF     National Institute of Justice (NIJ), 2006. The results of a study that examined the predictive and structural validity of an actuarial method for predicting traits associated with negligent and volatile behavior among police officer candidates. (NCJ 214121)
Racially Biased Policing: A Principled Response COPS PDF TXT   Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS), 2001. This report, funded by COPS and produced by the Police Executive Research Forum, will assist agencies in meeting the challenge of eradicating racially biased policing. It provides the first step in assisting law enforcement professionals, in collaboration with the community, to consider the issues and develop approaches for their community’s specific needs. The report guides law enforcement agencies in their response to racially biased policing and to the perceptions of its practice, thereby helping to strengthen citizen confidence in the police and improve police services in the community.
Reaching Out to North Carolina's Law Enforcement Community NIJ PDF     National Institute of Justice (NIJ), February 2001. This report presents the methodology and findings of an evaluation of a project for statewide distribution of a stress-prevention and treatment program for the North Carolina Highway Patrol. (NCJ 188874)
Recruiting and Retaining Women: A Self-Assessment Guide for Law Enforcement BJA / NCWP PDF TXT   Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA), National Center for Women in Policing (NCWP), June 2001. Under a grant from the U.S. Department of Justice, BJA and NCWP developed a self-assessment guide to assist agencies seeking to recruit and retain more women in sworn law enforcement positions. This publication will help federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies examine their policies and procedures to identify and remove obstacles to hiring and retaining sworn and civilian women employees at all levels within the organization. It also provides a list of resources for agencies to use when they plan or implement changes to their current policies and procedures.
Recruitment and Retention of Qualified Police Personnel: A Best Practices Guide IACP PDF     International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP), July 2000. A feature article published in "Big Ideas for Smaller Police Departments," a newsletter designed to respond to the needs of smaller police departments. Recruitment and retention of qualified law enforcement personnel is of great concern to communities around the country. Smaller departments are challenged by limited resources to advertise and compete against larger departments, often for the same applicants. The goal in writing this article was to find smaller departments around the country that are successful recruiting and retaining, identify their strengths, and compile those strengths in a best practices guide.
Recruitment and Retention Study Series: Sworn Police Personnel North Carolina Governor's Crime Commission PDF     North Carolina Governor's Crime Commission, April 2003. This report examines the challenges involved in recruiting and retaining North Carolina’s sworn police personnel. The findings are based on 124 responses to a 27-item survey that was administered to a random sample of 205 state and local police agencies. Survey questions probed issues related to recruiting sworn police officers, including specific strategies or techniques, number of applicants, and length of waiting list time for potential candidates. Attrition and retention were also probed through questions related to the agency’s turnover and vacancy rates. (NCJ 205838)
Recruitment and Retention Study Series: Sworn Sheriffs’ Personnel North Carolina Governor's Crime Commission PDF     North Carolina Governor's Crime Commission, April 2003. This report examines the challenges involved in recruiting and retaining North Carolina’s sworn sheriffs’ personnel. The findings are based on 49 responses to a 22-item survey was administered to a random sample of 80 sheriffs’ offices. Survey questions probed issues related to recruiting sworn sheriffs’ personnel, including specific strategies or techniques, number of applicants, and length of waiting list time for potential candidates (NCJ 205839)
Tennessee Law Enforcement and Family Support (LEAFS) Project NIJ PDF     National Institute of Justice (NIJ), 1999. A two-volume report that describes and evaluates a model for a stress-reduction program at regional law enforcement academies and includes course critiques by participants, sample lesson plans, and descriptions of law enforcement stress inoculation training. (NCJ 185888)
3. Ethics and Integrity
Addressing Police Misconduct DOJ PDF   HTML U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ), October 2000. Laws enforced by the Department of Justice in maintaining integrity for federal officers.
Bad Cops: A Study of Career-Ending Misconduct Among New York City Police Officers NIJ PDF     National Institute of Justice (NIJ), September 2006. This study examined the personal and career histories of all 1,543 New York City police officers who were involuntarily dismissed from the department for misconduct during 1975-96; they were compared with a randomly selected sample of their Police Academy classmates who had served honorably. (NCJ 215795)
Citizen Review of Police: Approaches and Implementation NIJ PDF TXT   National Institute of Justice (NIJ), 2001. An assessment of nine approaches to citizen oversight for jurisdictions interested in creating or enhancing an oversight system. It discusses the types of citizen oversight, potential benefits of oversight systems, limitations to citizen review, oversight responsibilities, staffing issues, and potential conflicts between oversight bodies and police departments. (NCJ 184430)
Civilian Oversight of the Police in the United States PARC PDF     Police Assessment Resource Center (PARC), 2003. The article discusses the history of policing and police reform in the United States and explores approaches to civilian oversight, including independent monitors, civilian review boards and "pattern or practice" consent decrees.
Coping with Police Misconduct in West Virginia USCCR PDF     United States Commission on Civil Rights (USCCR), January 2004. This report describes the ongoing problem of police brutality, and existing law and structure to address disciplinary issues; reviews past legislative attempts to reform disciplinary procedures; and discusses alternative models and methods, such as accountability and incentive strategies, used successfully elsewhere.
Corruption To Increase Dramatically National Institute of Ethics PDF     National Institute of Ethics, 2005. Brief overview of methods for preventing corruption through hiring practices.
Curbing Police Brutality: What Works? A Reanalysis of Citizen Complaints at the Organizational Level, Final Report NIJ PDF     National Institute of Justice (NIJ), November 1999. An analysis of data on citizen complaints against police use of excessive force. (NCJ 192518)
Developing and Sustaining a Culture of Integrity IACP     HTML International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP), April 2006. The senior leaders of the Virginia Beach Police Department recognized that their priorities and actions must be the centerpiece for developing and sustaining an organizational culture of integrity. In assuming this leadership responsibility, they launched three major initiatives: leadership and management development, an internal organizational focus, and an external organizational focus.
Employee Conduct: Investigations & Discipline COPS PDF TXT   Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS), September 2006. This guidebook explains the police employee conduct investigation and discipline processes of the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department (CMPD). It also discusses the Department's rationale for adopting each procedure and discipline philosophy. Designed based on focus group discussions with citizens and employees, the guidebook aims to inform and inspire greater public trust in the CMPD by creating confidence in these processes. The 34-page guidebook was developed with funding from the COPS Office, and was written by Bill Geller, of Geller & Associates, in collaboration with Major Ken Miller of the CMPD Internal Affairs Bureau.
Enhancing Police Integrity NIJ PDF     National Institute of Justice (NIJ), December 2005. This Research for Practice summarizes the survey findings and includes an assessment tool that police chiefs can use to measure integrity within their departments. (NCJ 209269)
Ethics Toolkit COPS / IACP     HTML Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS), International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP), n.d. This toolkit, a joint partnership between COPS and the IACP, addresses police ethics and serves as a call to action and a resource for law enforcement agencies. Local agencies using the activities and programs contained in the toolkit will heighten the awareness and visibility of law enforcement's ethical standards both internally and externally. The tools, including, but not limited to the oath of honor, reports, model policies, training, and a bibliography, will engage an agency in the building blocks of high ethical standards and to demonstrate a department's commitment to ethics and professionalism to the community.
Evaluating the Effects of Fatigue on Police Patrol Officers: Final Report NIJ PDF     National Institute of Justice (NIJ), February 2000. The study analyzed data on police work hours, work hour policies and procedures, accidents, injuries, illnesses, misconduct, and citizen complaints. It included self-report surveys and focus groups involving officers and their families, as well as data derived from computer-based noninvasive eye reaction tests of readiness for duty. (NCJ 184188)
Gender Differences in Leniency Towards Police Misconduct University of Maribor, Slovenia PDF     University of Maribor, Slovenia, September 2004. The questionnaire had been used previously to measure police integrity in the United States, Croatia, and Poland. It presents 11 brief scenarios of corrupt police behaviors that include the acceptance of gratuities, favoritism toward coworkers and friends who have broken the law, police use of excessive force, police killing of a fleeing suspect, filing of a false report, and rudeness toward the subject of a traffic stop. Respondents were asked to evaluate the seriousness of officer misconduct in each scenario, as well as the appropriate discipline, willingness to report the incident, and belief about other officers' willingness to report the misconduct. The focus of the analysis was on whether there were gender differences in the willingness of the respondents to report each scenario to appropriate supervisors, as well as the rationale for reporting or not reporting the misconduct. (NCJ 207999)
Global Forum on Fighting Corruption: Final Conference Report U.S. Department of State     HTML U.S. Department of State, September 1999. This is a summation of a conference in which participants addressed the significance of corruption, the link between economic governance and the private sector and corruption, ethics regimes in the public sector, legal frameworks and enforcement authorities, religious values and the struggle against corruption, and integrity and corruption issues according to specific groups of officials. The conference resulted in the formulation of guiding principles for fighting corruption and safeguarding integrity among justice and security officials.
How and Why a Department Becomes Dysfunctional National Institute of Ethics PDF     National Institute of Ethics, 2005. Brief overview of the pitfalls that department managers face in maintaining high ethical standards.
Managing the Problem Employee FBI PDF   HTML Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), November 2004. Tips on how to identify and properly deal with problematic employees.
Measurement of Police Integrity NIJ PDF TXT   National Institute of Justice (NIJ), May 2000. Following an overview of research pertinent to police officers' understanding of agency rules concerning police misconduct and the extent of their support for these rules, this paper reports on a survey that solicited information in key areas that form the foundation of an occupational/organizational culture theory of police integrity. (NCJ 181465)
National Association for Civilian Oversight of Law Enforcement NACOLE     HTML National Association for Civilian Oversight of Law Enforcement (NACOLE), n.d. Web site with information on oversight in policing.
National Criminal Justice Reference Service       HTML n.d. The National Criminal Justice Reference Service (NCJRS) is a federally funded resource offering justice and substance abuse information to support research, policy, and program development worldwide.
National Institute of Ethics National Institute of Ethics     HTML National Institute of Ethics, n.d. Web site for the nation's largest provider of training that helps prevent employee misconduct and enhances integrity. As a congressional award-winning, nonprofit, 501(c)(3) organization dedicated to furthering ethics and integrity throughout the United States, it provides integrity related certification programs, video training tapes, manuals, books, cartoon consulting, seminars, and processes that help prevent unethical acts. It also presents state-of-the-art seminars that involve high levels of participant interaction.
Police Attitudes Towards Abuse of Authority NIJ PDF TXT   National Institute of Justice (NIJ), 2000. With the assistance of 9 tables, this NIJ Research in Brief discusses the general findings of a national survey that explores police officers' views on the abuse of police authority. The brief particularly notes the roles that race, class, rank, sex, demeanor, and ideals of community-oriented policing play in determining the likelihood of abuse of authority. (NCJ 181312)
Police Ethics Trainings’ State-of-the-Art Now More Effective and Comprehensive National Institute of Ethics PDF     National Institute of Ethics, n.d. Brief overview of the need for ethics training in law enforcement agencies.
Police Integrity and Accountability in Philadelphia DOJ PDF     U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ), 2004. This study explored indicators of potential problem behavior in police officers, as well as officer attitudes and beliefs concerning police work. (NCJ 207823)
Police Perjury DOJ PDF     U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ), April 2000. A study of 508 New York City police officers that used the factorial survey method to determine the underlying conditions and circumstances that an officer would take into account when deciding to commit perjury. (NCJ 181241)
Principles for Promoting Police Integrity DOJ PDF     U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ), January 2001. Based on recommendations of a 1999 national conference ("Strengthening Police-Community Relationships") that brought together police executives, union representatives, academic experts, and civil rights and community leaders, this booklet presents principles for police practices that build community trust, enhance police accountability, and reduce police misconduct. (NCJ 186189)
Principles of Good Policing: Avoiding Violence between Police and Citizens School Violence Research Center PDF     School Violence Research Center, September 2003. This publication will assist law enforcement agencies in reducing the incidence of violence between police officers and citizens.
Principles of Police Integrity: Examples of Promising Police Practices and Roles; Principles for Promoting Police Integrity DOJ PDF     U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ), January 2001. A diverse law enforcement agency can better develop relationships with the community it serves, promote trust in the fairness of law enforcement, and facilitate effective policing by encouraging citizen support and cooperation. Agencies should identify and maintain ongoing working relationships with local, regional, and national minority and women’s organizations and seek their assistance in publicizing the agency’s commitment to diversity and in recruiting qualified minorities and women candidates. Law enforcement agencies must ensure that their hiring processes operate fairly on the basis of race, sex, and national origin and do not present unnecessary barriers to the employment of minorities or women. (NCJ 186189)
Self-Accountability: The Ultimate Leadership Tool National Institute of Ethics PDF     National Institute of Ethics, 2005. Brief overview of good administration as way to prevent ethical dysfunction by implementing strict self-accountability.
Standards of Conduct and Disciplinary Process   PDF     Maryland Department of Juvenile Justice, 2000. The Standards of Conduct are intended to ensure fairness and parity in the handling of disciplinary matters and the imposition and appeal of sanctions. The procedures and time frames are structured to protect the procedural rights of employees and the integrity of the Department's programs and facilities.
Street Cop Ethics NLERA     HTML National Law Enforcement Recruiter Association (NLERA), March 2001. Tips on ethics for police trainees and a quiz on street cop ethics. Originally published in "The Law Enforcement Trainer." (NCJ 201727)
The Code of Silence Antidote National Institute of Ethics PDF     National Institute of Ethics, 2005. Brief overview of methods for preventing corruption by eliminating the code of silence.
The Institute for Criminal Justice Ethics COPS     HTML The Institute for Criminal Justice Ethics, n.d., Web site for the only nonprofit, university-based center of its kind in the United States, was established to foster greater concern for ethical issues among practitioners and scholars in the criminal justice field.
Turning Necessity Into Virtue: Pittsburgh's Experience With a Federal Consent Decree COPS PDF TXT   Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS), 2002. This report examines the 5-year experience of the police and citizens of Pittsburgh under a federal court consent decree (statement of specific policy and practice changes the city must make), drawing lessons for other cities.
Use of Force COPS     HTML Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS), 2003. A COPS Office Community Policing Topic on police use of force that includes a discussion of the subject along with descriptions of guides and reports and training and technical assistance resources.
When Excessive Use of Force Occurs COPS     HTML Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS), 2005. Brief overview of survey results dealing with the code of silence.
4. Early Intervention
Early Intervention System: A Tool to Encourage & Support High Quality Performance--A Guidebook for the Public and Our Employees On What We Do and Why We Do It COPS PDF TXT   Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS), September 2006. This handbook, which is presented in question and answer format, answers questions about the Early Intervention System (EIS) in the Charlotte-Mecklenburg, North Carolina Police Department.
Early Intervention Systems for Law Enforcement: A Planning and Management Guide COPS PDF TXT   Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS), August 2003. This guide offers information about Early Intervention systems for spotting officers who have performance issues in the field.
Strategies for Intervening with Officers through Early Intervention Systems: A Guide for Supervisors COPS PDF TXT   Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS), February 2006. Practical advice on many aspects of Early Intervention Systems (EIS), including defining the role of the first-line supervisor, structuring the intervention process for officers who have reached (or about to reach) a threshold within the system, identifying ways to provide the various programs and services that supplement and reinforce EIS, and creating a broader culture of accountability in law enforcement agencies.
Supervision and Intervention within Early Intervention Systems:  A Guide for Law Enforcement Chief Executives COPS PDF TXT   Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS), November 2005. Practical advice on many aspects of Early Intervention Systems (EIS), including defining the role of the first-line supervisor, structuring the intervention process for officers who have reached (or are about to reach) a threshold within the system, identifying ways to provide the various programs and services that supplement and reinforce EIS, and creating a broader culture of accountability in law enforcement agencies. In addition, it presents some key recommendations for developing, implementing, and maintaining EIS, based on the lessons learned from other law enforcement agencies.
5. Managing Stress
Developing a Law Enforcement Stress Program for Officers and Their Families NIJ PDF TXT   National Institute of Justice (NIJ), 1997. This book provides a comprehensive and up-to-date presentation of a number of police stress programs that have made significant efforts to help departments, individual officers, civilian employees, and officers' families cope with the stresses of a law enforcement career. (NCJ 163175)
Executive Summary of the Law Enforcement Assistance & Development (LEAD) Program: Reduction of Familial and Organizational Stress in Law Enforcement NIJ PDF     National Institute of Justice (NIJ), 2001. This document provides an overview of the Law Enforcement Assistance & Development (LEAD) Program. (NCJ 192276)
Final Grant Report of the Law Enforcement Assistance & Development (LEAD) Program: Reduction of Familial and Organizational Stress in Law Enforcement NIJ PDF     National Institute of Justice (NIJ), 2001. This document highlights the Law Enforcement Assistance & Development (LEAD) Program in Ames, Iowa. (NCJ 192277)
Law Enforcement and Corrections Family Support: Development and Evaluation of a Stress Management Program for Officers and Their Spouses, Executive Summary NIJ PDF     National Institute of Justice (NIJ), November 2002. This report summarizes the development and evaluation of a program that provided an innovative stress prevention and treatment program for police officers and their families. (NCJ 197899)
Law Enforcement and Corrections Family Support: Development and Evaluation of a Stress Management Program for Officers and Their Spouses, Final Report NIJ PDF     National Institute of Justice (NIJ), November 2002. This paper reports on a project designed to develop, demonstrate, and test an innovative stress prevention and treatment program for law enforcement officers. (NCJ 197900)
Law Enforcement Family Support Initiative Project NIJ PDF     National Institute of Justice (NIJ), 1999. This report describes the Collier County, Florida Law Enforcement Family Support Initiative Project and Florida's Critical Incident Stress Management Team. (NCJ 185890)
Law Enforcement Family Support: Training Program for Reduction of Stress Among Law Enforcement Officers and Their Families NIJ PDF     National Institute of Justice (NIJ), 1998. This manual presents materials and guidelines for New York State's program of police training on stress reduction and management. (NCJ 185969)
National Institute of Justice Final Report "Project Shields" NIJ PDF     National Institute of Justice (NIJ), 2000. The project specifically addressed: the need for a well-characterized, psychometrically validated and up-to-date police stress assessment tool; the lack of information on domestic violence in police families and its relationship, if any, with police stress; and the identification of officer-driven strategies to address police stress, especially police stress-related domestic violence. (NCJ 185892)
On-the-Job-Stress in Policing--Reducing It and Preventing It NIJ PDF     National Institute of Justice (NIJ), January 2000. This article summarizes an NIJ report that documents the causes and effects of job-related stress on law enforcement officers and their families. (NCJ 180079)
Organizational Approach to Developing a Stress Program NIJ PDF     National Institute of Justice (NIJ), May 2000. A project conducted by the Longview Police Guild in Longview, Washington started in December 1998 and funded by the NIJ, focused on the use of an organizational approach to address police occupational stress. (NCJ 187779)
Program for the Reduction of Stress for New York City Police Officers and Their Families, Final Report NIJ PDF     National Institute of Justice (NIJ), December 1998. This report describes the development and operation of a volunteer peer support program funded by an NIJ grant to expand and further develop a program to reduce stress among New York City police officers and their families. (NCJ 185845)
Rookie Stress Program: Line Level Supervisor/Human Relations Training; Executive Summary Report NIJ PDF     National Institute of Justice (NIJ), 1998. This executive summary report on the Rookie Stress Program of the Miami, Florida Police Department provides proactive, preventive interventions that target the stress and emotional strains that are often experienced by rookie officers and their families. The report also profiles a supplemental training program that provides intensive line-level supervisor skills training to all sergeants and field training officers in the department. (NCJ 1859335)
Stomp Out Stress NIJ PDF     National Institute of Justice (NIJ), n.d. A report of the findings from a federally supported study to provide a cost-effective, education-based stress intervention program for probation officers within the Harris County (Texas) Community Supervision and Corrections Department, as well as resource material on the curriculum of the intervention program. (NCJ 212419)
Stress and Job Satisfaction in an Urban Sheriff's Department: Contributions of Work and Family History, Community-Oriented Policing and Job Assignment NIJ PDF     National Institute of Justice (NIJ), June 2003. A study that examines the relationship between stress and job satisfaction among corrections officers, patrol officers, and detectives in an urban sheriff’s department. (NCJ 203978)
Stress in Policing NIJ PDF     National Institute of Justice (NIJ), 2002. This analysis of police occupational stress and its mitigation develops the thesis that no matter what else may be done to prevent and ameliorate stress, organizational change may hold the key to improving the lives of police officers. (NCJ 198030)
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