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COPS Publications


Acquaintance Rape of College Students

    Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS), August 2003. This guide describes the problem of acquaintance rape of college students, addressing its scope, causes and contributing factors; methods for analyzing it on a particular campus; tested responses; and measures for assessing response effectiveness. With this information, police and public safety officers can more effectively prevent the problem.

An Evaluation of the COPS Office Methamphetamine Initiative

    Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS), April 2003. This COPS-funded evaluation conducted by the Institute for Law and Justice and 21st Century Solutions evaluates COPS’ first six methamphetamine grants. This evaluation focuses on the histories of the meth problems in these cities and includes detailed process evaluations of each grant’s implementation. This report provides insight into the ways in which these agencies responded to their meth problems and should be of great interest to those dealing with similar drug problems in their jurisdictions.

Benefits and Consequences of Police Crackdowns

    Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS), October 2003. This COPS Response Guide series deals with crackdowns, a response police commonly use to address crime and disorder problems. Crackdowns involve high police visibility and numerous arrests. They may use undercover or plainclothes officers working with uniformed police, and may involve other official actions in addition to arrests.

Clandestine Methamphetamine Labs, 2nd Edition

    Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS), August 2006. This problem-oriented guide for police addresses the problem of clandestine drug labs. Offenders manufacture a variety of illicit drugs in such labs with methamphetamine accounting for 80 to 90 percent of the labs total drug production. Accordingly, the problem of clandestine drug labs is closely tied with the problems associated with methamphetamine abuse. This guide is an essential tool for law enforcement to help analyze and develop responses to their local clandestine methamphetamine lab problem (2nd Edition).

Combating Methamphetamine Laboratories and Abuse: Strategies for Success

    Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS), December 2002. This piece evaluates COPS’ first six meth grants. Evaluations focus on the history of the methamphetamine problem in the areas to which the grants were awarded and develop detailed process evaluations of each grant’s implementation. This publication provides a brief summary of the findings of the National Evaluation and suggests ways that agencies can better deal with their own methamphetamine problems through a discussion of the COPS Problem-Oriented Policing Guide to Clandestine Laboratories.

Drug Dealing in Open-Air Markets

    Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS), January 2005. Open-air markets represent the lowest level of the drug distribution network. Low-level markets need to be tackled effectively not only because of the risks posed to market participants, but also to reduce the harms that illicit drug use can inflict on the local community. This guide describes the problem and reviews the factors that increase the risks of drug dealing in open-air markets. The guide then identifies a series of questions that might assist you in analyzing your local problem and reviews responses to the problem and what is known about these from evaluative research and police practice.

Drug Dealing in Privately Owned Apartment Complexes

    Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS), September 2003. This Guide focuses on drug dealing in privately owned apartment complexes. The Guide makes a clear distinction between open- and closed-drug markets, provides information on what is known about each market type, and provides questions to ask when analyzing each market. It also proposes various responses designed to close drug markets and provides a full range of problem-specific measures to determine the effectiveness of those responses.

Methamphetamine Initiative Final Environmental Assessment

    Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS), May 2003. This report assesses the impact on the environment of grant policies under the COPS Methamphetamine Initiative, which encompasses funding for the dismantling of clandestine methamphetamine labs and the associated cleanup of hazardous materials involved in methamphetamine manufacture.

Prescription Fraud

    Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS), June 2004. This guide addresses the problem of prescription fraud, a significantly growing problem for many law enforcement agencies. It begins by describing the problem and reviewing factors that contribute to it. The guide also identifies a series of questions that might assist you in analyzing your local problem. Finally, it reviews responses to the problem and what is known about these from evaluative research and police practice.

Rave Parties

    Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS), August 2004. This guide addresses problems associated with rave parties. Rave parties–or, more simply, raves–are dance parties that feature fast-paced, repetitive electronic music and accompanying light shows. Raves are the focus of rave culture, a youth-oriented subculture that blends music, art and social ideals (e.g., peace, love, unity, respect, tolerance, happiness). Rave culture also entails the use of a range of licit and illicit drugs. Drug use is intended to enhance ravers´ sensations and boost their energy so they can dance for long periods.

Underage Drinking

    Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS), September 2004. This guide addresses the problem of underage drinking. It begins by describing the problem and reviewing factors that increase the risks of it. The guide also identifies a series of questions that might assist you in analyzing your local problem. Finally, it reviews responses to the problem and what is known about these from evaluative research and police practice.

 

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