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Crime Mapping / Crime Analysis


Crime Analysis and Crime Mapping Information Clearinghouse, 8th Edition

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    Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS), October 2003. Forty-nine page bibliography of crime mapping resources.

Crime Mapping and Analysis by Community Organizations in Hartford, Connecticut

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    National Institute of Justice (NIJ), March 2001.  This document is an assessment of how community organizations in Hartford, Connecticut, used the Neighborhood Problem Solving (NPS) system, a computer based mapping and crime analysis technology. The NPS system allows its users to create maps and other reports showing crime rates.

Crime Mapping Newsletter

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    Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS), Fall 2004. The Crime Mapping Newsletter is a quarterly publication of the Police Foundation supported by COPS Office funding. It provides articles and examples of mapping and crime analysis on a wide variety of topics ranging from terrorism to evaluation of crime mapping software products. The Newsletter currently has an international distribution of over 4,000 individuals interested in crime mapping and law enforcement analysis.

Crime Mapping Principal and Practice

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    National Institute of Justice (NIJ), December 1999.  This guide introduces the science of crime mapping to police officers, crime analysts, and other people interested in visualizing crime data through the medium of maps.

Demonstrating the Analytical Utility of GIS for Police Operations: A Final Report

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    National Institute of Justice (NIJ), July 2001. This report investigates three modules of crime mapping. The first is analyzing crime intensity over different geographic locations, the second is analyzing hazardous police work areas, and the third is mapping special events such as natural disasters.

Frequently Asked Questions of Crime Analysis and Mapping

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    Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS), November 2001. These frequently asked questions, developed by COPS and the Police Foundation, address several common themes identified by crime analysis and mapping professionals. The answers include links to other crime analysis and mapping resources, such as publications and web pages that provide useful and comprehensive information about particular topics.

Geocoding in Law Enforcement, Final Report

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    Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS), August 2000. This report defines and outlines geocoding and its uses in law enforcement. It also overviews how the software is used specifically to access information about a geographic location.

Guidelines to Implement and Evaluate Crime Analysis and Mapping in Law Enforcement

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    Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS), October 2000. This publication describes how crime mapping should be used as a problem-solving analysis tool by outlining goals and data sources. (NCJ 190383)

Integrating Community Policing and Computer Mapping

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    Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS), February 2000. The Police Foundation has provided technical assistance to agencies funded by the COPS Office to help them overcome problems in implementing computer mapping, and to facilitate their ongoing use of crime mapping in community policing and problem solving.

Introductory Guide to Crime Analysis and Mapping

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    Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS), November 2001. The article details map interpretation and problem-solving using crime mapping software.  (NCJ 194685)

Law Enforcement Agencies with Crime Mapping

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    National Institute of Justice (NIJ), May 2005.  This web site, managed by Mapping Analysis & Public Safety Office (MAPS), provides links to local agencies that utilize various types of crime mapping.

Manual of Crime Analysis Map Production

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    Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS), November 2000. This manual provides guidelines to interpret  maps used in crime analysis. (NCJ 190424)

Mapping Out Crime

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    National Institute of Justice (NIJ), July 1999. The report recommends crime mapping best practices so that they to benefit communities across the country. It describes specific steps that the federal government can take to support local law enforcement agencies and help communities across the nation make their streets and neighborhoods safer.

Privacy in the Information Age: A Guide for Sharing Crime Maps and Spatial Data

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    National Institute of Justice (NIJ), July 2001. This report is designed to provide guidance to law enforcement personnel, researchers, and others who are creating and sharing crime maps. It contains real-life examples and illustrations contributed by various police departments that demonstrate a variety of techniques that promote privacy, crime mapping, and data confidentiality.

Results of the First Invitational Advance Crime Mapping Topics Symposium

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    National Law Enforcement & Corrections Training Center (NLETC), June 2001.  As policing has evolved as a profession, law enforcement agencies increasingly dedicate staff positions to crime research, planning and analysis. This manuscript focuses on the action or process of crime analysis.  For the purposes of this manuscript, crime analysis is divided into four analytical functions: crime series analysis, resource allocation studies, problem solving, and discrete site analysis.

Spatial Analyses of Crime

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    National Institute of Justice (NIJ), July 2000.  This article was first published in Measurement and Analysis of Crime and Justice, volume 4. The focus of this article is on methodological issues in spatial statistical analyses of crime data, highlighting practical and accessible methods of exploratory data analysis that should be the starting place of any empirical analyses of the relationship of place to crime.

Strategic Approaches to Community Safety Initiative

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    National Institute of Justice (NIJ), December 2000.  The Strategic Approaches to Community Safety Initiative (SASCI) is a pilot project developed by the U.S. Department of Justice.  SASCI promotes multiagency collaboration to data-driven problem solving.   This document focuses on one of four major components of SASCI, the development of communities analytic capacity through enhancement of their technology infrastructure.

U.S. Department of Justice, Regional Crime Analysis Information System

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    This website provides information about the crime analysis system called RCAGIS (Regional Crime Analysis GIS) developed by U.S. Department of Justice Criminal Division GIS Staff, in conjunction with the Baltimore County Police Department and the RCAS group. RCAGIS is an ESRI MapObjects® based system that is designed to facilitate the analysis of crime on a regional basis.

Users' Guide to Mapping Software for Police Agencies 6th Edition

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    Office of Community Policing Oriented Services (COPS), October 2003. This COPS Office/ Police Foundation report provides a review of a wide range of mapping software and geographic information systems, focusing on their functionality and ease of use by members of police departments. It should be of great interest to those seeking to purchase crime-mapping software.

Using Geographic Information Systems to Map Crime Victim Services

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    Office of Justice Programs (OJP), February 2003. This monograph reviews the use of Geographic Information Systems, a computer application that generates maps from crime databases, and how it can help agencies understand the significance of where, when, and by whom crimes are committed.

What Is Crime Mapping?- Briefing Book

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    National Institute of Justice (NIJ), June 2005.  This online briefing book outlines how mapping crime can help law enforcement protect citizens more effectively in the areas they serve.  The online book explains how crime mapping can aide law enforcement in mapping crime locations, calculating crime density, combining crime data from multiple resources, determining hot spots, keeping patrols up to date, implementing strategically placed closed circuit cameras, and analyzing crime proximity.

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