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Victims and Victimization


    Bitter Earth: Child Sexual Abuse in Indian Country, Discussion Guide

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      Office for Victims of Crime (OVC), 1999. This discussion guide is designed as an educational tool for increasing the awareness of child sexual abuse in Indian Country among community members and non-Indian service providers. This guide is also intended to be used in conjunction with a video that deals with child sexual abuse. The discussion guide identifies various training topics, including community resources targeting child sexual abuse victims and their families, the tribal leader's role in responding to child sexual abuse, jurisdictional issues, traditional beliefs and healing approaches that are culturally relevant, juvenile sex offenders, incest, and the link between drug abuse and sexual abuse. (NCJ 179105)

    Bringing Victims into Community Policing

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      Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS), September 2002. This publication focuses on the role of crime victims in advancing community policing. It includes first-responder guides to dealing with victims, a model policy for the prevention of repeat victimization, and the benefits of developing relationships among the police, crime victims, and victim organizations.

    Child Sexual Abuse on New Mexico Tribal Land 1999-2004

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      Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA), November 2004. This study determined whether there were any differences between reported child sexual abuse cases that originated on New Mexico tribal lands compared to nontribal areas, based on data from a program called Safehouse, in Albuquerque, New Mexico, that serves abused, neglected, and traumatized children and their families. There were a greater proportion of male victims and female perpetrators among nontribal cases compared to tribal cases. The majority of tribal cases involved Native-American offenders and victims. For nontribal cases, perpetrators were more likely to be parents of the victim or a boyfriend or girlfriend of a biological parent; among tribal cases however, perpetrators were more likely to be extended family members. (NCJ 212236)

    Children’s Justice Act Partnerships for Indian Communities

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      Office for Victims of Crime (OVC), June 2003. Since 1989, the Federal Crime Victims Division within the OVC has provided funding to American Indian tribes through the Children’s Justice Act (CJA) Partnerships for Indian Communities grant program. These funds are used to help tribes develop, establish, and operate programs to improve the investigation, prosecution, and handling of child abuse cases, particularly cases of child sexual abuse, in a manner that limits additional trauma to the child victim. (NCJ 201300)

    Impact Evaluation of STOP Grant Program for Reducing Violence Against Women Among Indian Tribes, Final Report

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      National Institute of Justice (NIJ), July 2002. This is the final report of an evaluation conducted from 1996 to the summer of 2001 assessing 123 American Indian projects that received grant funding under the STOP (Service, Training, Officers, Prosecutors) grant project of the VAIW (Violence Against Indian Women) program, which is intended to counter domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking against Indian women. This report provides basic descriptive information about who is served by the programs, the structuring of programs, what services are being provided, service recipient responses, and level of satisfaction, as well as the overall impact of the program. Specific recommendations are provided under the general areas of coordinated community response, victim services, law enforcement, and prosecution. (NCJ 195174)

    Impact Evaluation of STOP Grant Program for Reducing Violence Against Women Among Indian Tribes

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      National Institute of Justice (NIJ), February 2001. This report presents the methodology and findings of an impact evaluation of Indian tribal programs intended to assist law enforcement and prosecution efforts to develop and strengthen strategies to combat violent crimes against women, as well as strategies for victim services in such cases. (NCJ 186235)

    Improving Tribal/Federal Prosecution of Child Sexual Abuse Cases through Agency Cooperation

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      National Institute of Justice (NIJ), April 2001. This journal article discussed the Federal Government’s revised efforts and approach in handling crime and justice on Indian land facing an increasing public safety crisis. American Indians living in the United States are victims of violent crime at more than twice the rate of all U.S. residents and the number of law enforcement officers patrolling tribal lands in far behind the per capita ratio in non-Indian communities. This article described various Federal Government initiatives and collaborative efforts to empower tribes to combat crime at the local level. (NCJ 187712)

    Interagency Response to Domestic Violence

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      Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS), July 2003. This study examines one city’s efforts to reduce domestic violence through the coordinated work of the city police department and a wide range of criminal justice, social services, and community agencies. This research entailed study of an interagency domestic violence coalition, the Domestic Violence Coordinating Committee (DVCC), as well as two exploratory analyses of the city police department’s domestic violence data. After presenting the methodology and literature review, the findings of this study are presented in two parts.

    Intergenerational Trauma in Native American Communities: A Framework for Healing

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      University of Montana, 2004. This presentation discusses the nature and results of trauma in Native American communities.

    Measuring Fear: Strategies for Gauging School Climate and Implementing Mental Health Recovery Solutions

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      University of Montana, 2004. This presentation discusses school and community safety, mental health, technology integration, and early intervention.

    Police-Community Partnerships to Address Domestic Violence

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      Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS), March 2006. Through the community policing philosophy and its practices, some law enforcement agencies are seeking to improve their effectiveness in dealing with the problem of domestic violence by forming police-community partnerships to enhance their response options. PERF, with funding from the COPS Office, explored the nature, function, and impact of such police-community partnerships. The research shows that partnerships between police and community partners have made improvements in the way that agencies communicate with each other and in how they focus their energies on improving the safety of victims of domestic violence. This publication highlights such initiatives around the country that can be replicated to better address domestic violence.

    Tribal Domestic Violence Case Law: Annotations for Selected Tribal Cases Related to Domestic Violence

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      Tribal Law and Policy Institute, 2003. This compendium is designed to assist tribal judicial officers in understanding how some tribal governments have handled certain legal issues within the context of domestic violence cases. This compendium does not include every tribal court opinion on domestic violence. It is limited to those tribal court opinions that have been published and disseminated to the public, including cases found in the Indian Law Reporter, the Oklahoma Tribal Court Reports, and the Northwest Regional Appellate Court Reporter, as well as cases available on the internet.

    Tribal Strategies Against Violence: Chickasaw Nation Case Study

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      National Institute of Justice (NIJ), January 2002. This report documents the activities implemented by the Chickasaw Nation, along with their impact, under two grant periods of the U. S. Justice Department’s initiative of Tribal Strategies Against Violence (TSAV), which is a federal-tribal partnership intended to reduce crime, violence, and drug demand in seven American Indian tribes. This evaluation’s goals were to document how TSAV strategies had evolved and how comprehensive strategies had been implemented. Another evaluation goal was to analyze how differences in local cultures, physical environments, or government structures at the tribal site may have affected program implementation. TSAV activities had reduced drunk driving, drug use, and gang activity. (NCJ 206037)

    Tribal Strategies Against Violence: Cross-Site Evaluation Report, Executive Summary

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      National Institute of Justice (NIJ), January 2002. This document evaluates the Tribal Strategies Against Violence (TSAV) initiative. The TSAV initiative was designed to empower American Indian tribes to improve the quality of life in their communities by fostering strategic planning to identify community problems and to implement locally developed partnerships for addressing those problems. The more successful a tribe was in bringing together critical tribal criminal justice entities as partners, the more successful it was in addressing a broad range of crime and violence issues. (NCJ 195791)

    Tribal Strategies Against Violence: Cross-Site Evaluation Report, Full Report

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      National Institute of Justice (NIJ), January 2002. This document evaluates the Tribal Strategies Against Violence (TSAV) initiative. The ultimate purpose was the development of reservation and community-wide strategies to reduce crime, violence, and substance abuse. Findings showed that changes in the Tribal Codes and Tribal Court Systems occurred for all three of the Tribes that their own courts with jurisdiction over criminal, civil, and juvenile justice issues on their reservations. Most sites brought about key changes in their support systems for crime and violence victims and perpetrators. (NCJ 195790)

    Tribal Strategies Against Violence: Fort Peck Assiniboine and Sioux Tribes Case Study

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      National Institute of Justice (NIJ), June 2004. This report documents the activities implemented by the Fort Peck Assiniboine and Sioux Tribes, along with their impact, under three grant awards of the U.S. Justice Department’s initiative of Tribal Strategies Against Violence (TSAV). The evaluation found that significant progress was made in collaborating with nontribal entities, notably in interaction with several public schools and police departments. There was little or no statistical evidence to document TSAV’s impact on crime or violence; however, there was evidence that the project was effective in building community awareness about violence, fostering cooperation among the TSAV partners, identifying additional funding to apply to targeted problems, improving services of TSAV partner agencies, and enhancing the system for dealing with domestic violence. (NCJ 206034)

    Tribal Strategies Against Violence: Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians Case Study

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      National Institute of Justice (NIJ), June 2004.This report documents the activities implemented by the Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians, along with their impact, under two grant periods from the U.S. Justice Department’s initiative of Tribal Strategies Against Violence (TSAV). The TSAV partners made substantial structural changes to the reservation’s criminal justice system through the enactment of tribal law related to domestic violence, inhalant and other drug abuse, and through the issuance of zero-tolerance laws/policies as well as police who deal with sexual harassment among tribal employees and nonsmoking in tribal facilities. (NCJ 206035)

    Tribal Strategies Against Violence: Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians Case Study

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      National Institute of Justice (NIJ), June 2004. This report document the activities implemented by the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians, along with their impact, under two grant periods from the U.S. Justice Department’s initiative of Tribal Strategies Against Violence (TSAV). The evaluators concluded that the Turtle Mountain Band TSAV program faithfully represented the TSAV’s envisioned institutionalization of a community-wide problem solving process and that it deserves to be a model for other tribes. (NCJ 206036)

    Victim Programs to Serve Native Americans

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      Office for Victims of Crime (OVC), February 1992. This report describes the programs provided by the Office for Victims of Crime (OVC) of the Department of Justice that serve Native American crime victims and discusses the effects that the programs are having in American Indian communities. OVC activities in American Indian communities have included establishment of victim assistance programs on reservation, and the establishment of programs to improve the investigation and prosecution of child sexual abuse cases in Indian communities. (NCJ 133963)

    Victim Services: Promising Practices in Indian Country

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      Office for Victims of Crime (OVC), November 2004. This booklet describes 12 programs of services for crime victims being conducted b various Indian tribes throughout the United States. Information on each program includes names, when each was established, the service area, the population served, source of funding, and contact information. A brief program description is followed by discussion of particular services, their cultural relevance, and keys to success. Other tribal victim services programs provide various services to victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, homicide, child sexual abuse, child neglect, and drunk driving. (NCJ 207019)

    Violence Against Indian Women, Final Revised Report

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      National Institute of Justice (NIJ), January 2003. This study explored the patterns of violence against women in 15 Native American communities and examined the readiness of these communities to develop and implement effective violence-prevention efforts. The project began with a survey of the communities to determine the extent to which western Native American communities were aware of violence against women as a problem, had access to intervention and prevention programs that targeted violence against women, and had actually used resources. The project concluded that effective and sustainable community mobilization to combat violence against women must be based on the involvement of multiple systems and the use of within-tribal community resources and strengths. (NCJ 198828)

     

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