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Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS) is a component within the U.S. Department of Justice dedicated to community policing. Learn More About COPS.

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Department of Justice SealCommunity Oriented Policing Services Outlines Best Practices for Use of Body-Worn Cameras for Police Officers

WASHINGTON, D.C. - Today the U.S. Department of Justice Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS Office) released Implementing a Body-Worn Camera Program: Recommendations and Lessons Learned. The report analyzes some of the costs and benefits of law enforcement using body-worn video technology. Read More

Department of Justice SealCOPS Office Awards Nearly $5 Million for the Collaborative Reform Initiative

WASHINGTON, D.C. - Today the U.S. Department of Justice Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS Office) released nearly $5 million in federal funding for the Collaborative Reform Initiative for Technical Assistance. Read More

Department of Justice SealCOPS Office Awards $1 Million for Critical Response Technical Assistance

WASHINGTON, D.C. - Today the U.S. Department of Justice Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS Office) released $1 million in federal funding for Critical Response Technical Assistance grants under the Community Policing Development program. In Fiscal Year 2014, the COPS Office had a competitive grant solicitation for CPD funding with eight topic areas. This is the first of these eight topics to be awarded. Read More

Department of Justice SealCOPS Office Releases 6 Awareness Briefs on Social Media Tactics Used by Violent Extremists

WASHINGTON, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Justice Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS Office) recently released six awareness briefs available to the law enforcement field, adding to the extensive library of community policing publications and CDs it already offers completely free of charge. Read More

Photo: Jennifer Thompson and Meg Morrow September, 2014 - Wrongful Convictions

In this podcast, Jennifer Thompson, the crime victim from the Ronald Cotton case in North Carolina, who misidentified the perpetrator of her rape; and Meg Morrow, attorney advisor, U.S. Department of Justice Office for Victims of Crime discuss the impacts of wrongful convictions on survivors, victims of crime, and law enforcement.Read More

Photo: Mr. Eddie Lowery and Dr. Saul Kassin September, 2014 - DNA Exoneration and False Confessions

In this podcast, Mr. Eddie Lowery discusses a DNA exoneration case that was based on a false confession. The second part is with Dr. Saul Kassin, who explains the counterintuitive false confession phenomenon. Saul Kassin is a distinguished professor of psychology at John Jay College of Criminal Justice and Massachusetts Professor of Psychology at Williams College. Read More

Photo: Chief William G. Brooks III and Major Mike Smathers September, 2014 - Police Reforms to Prevent Wrongful Convictions

In this podcast, Chief William G. Brooks III, with the Norwood Police Department in Norwood, Massachusetts, and Major Mike Smathers with the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department in Charlotte, North Carolina discuss endorsing and implementing key police reforms to prevent wrongful convictions. Read More

Photo: Marvin Anderson and Dr. Jennifer Dysart September, 2014 - Eyewitness Misidentification: How it Happens and the Impact on the Innocent

In this podcast, Marvin Anderson will discuss his DNA exoneration case. The second part is with Dr. Jennifer Dysart focusing on practical information for law enforcement. Read More

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